Can You Get Enough Protein on a Plant-Based Diet?

It was long believed that because animal-based protein contains all the essential amino acids needed by the body, and is utilized faster, that it is superior to plant protein sources. Now we know that faster is not better. Animal proteins speed the growth of bad tissues- like cancer cells- along with muscle cells, and also increase the risk of liver and kidney disease.

Newsflash: There is protein in most plant foods.

The highest sources of plant protein include beans, lentils, peas, tofu, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. Foods like rice and bean burritos, veggie chili, Thai curry, lentil shepherd’s pie, and chickpea omelets are some of my favorite meals that are packed with protein.


A better question is how much protein do you need?

The answer: Not nearly as much as you have been led to believe. Whether you are a couch potato or a professional athlete, you need at most 10% of your daily calories to come from protein. But, really, it’s much more important that you count your fiber.

Isn’t protein from plant sources inferior to animal-sourced protein?

It was long believed that because animal-based protein contains all the essential amino acids needed by the body, and is utilized faster, that it is superior to plant protein sources. Now we know that faster is not better. Animal proteins speed the growth of bad tissues- like cancer cells- along with muscle cells, and also increase the risk of liver and kidney disease. 

No one is dying from protein deficiency.

If you eat a variety of plant foods, you will not need to worry about your protein intake…Even if you are lifting the big weights. But, if you are eating animal-based proteins, you do need to worry about heart disease, stroke, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer.

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